‘Boudoir photographer’ talks taking sexy snaps

0
21

[ad_1]

He may work in the city that never sleeps, but this photographer is ready to take you to bed.

Firas Jannan, 43, quit a lucrative job in finance in 2018 to kickstart a career taking racy pictures — and he hasn’t looked back.

Boudoir photography — which features subjects in risqué poses and various states of undress — has been gaining popularity across New York City. What used to be a fringe novelty is now a mainstream tool to boost relationships and self-esteem, and Jannan’s business is booming.

“No more conferences, no more meetings … it’s fantastic!” Jannan enthused in an interview with The Post, discussing how he swapped Skype calls for scantily clad clients.

Jannan co-owns Boudoir By FJ with his wife, Veronica, and he conducts photoshoots with his female clients from the spare bedroom of their Bronx apartment. Veronica says it has taken a “tremendous amount of trust” to build the business with her beau.

But while some may assume there is a sexual dimension between the snapper and the subject, Jannan says that simply is not the case.

Jannan is seen shooting his subject in the spare bedroom of his Bronx home.
Jannan is seen directing his subject in the spare bedroom of his Bronx home.
New York Post

“Boudoir photography is so much more than just sexy pictures … It’s about empowerment and body positivity. It’s about showing the person in front of me how beautiful they can be regardless of what they think about themselves,” he stated.

While some clients pose for the sultry snaps to please their partner, there are often far more personal motivations at play.

“We have clients who have had bad sexual experiences, they’ve had trauma in their lives,” Jannan said. “They’ve been told they’ll never be beautiful, they’ve been told they’ll never be sexy. Doing a boudoir photoshoot is something that empowers them, and makes them rise above.”

Firas Jannan and his wife Veronica own Boudoir By FJ together.
Firas Jannan and his wife, Veronica, own Boudoir By FJ together.
New York Post

The Post dropped by the Jannans’ apartment during one recent photoshoot, described on the Boudoir By SJ website as “an experience.”

Packages start at $345, with paying clients greeted at the door with a charcuterie board and Champagne.

A professional hair and makeup artist is also on hand, making sure each client is camera-ready.

After around 90 minutes of being primped and polished, the subject is directed into Jannan’s spare bedroom to have their photos taken. Each shoot lasts around two hours, with the clients posing on a bed or against a doorway as Jannan clicks away with his camera.

Firas Jannan is laying bare the secrets of his career as a boudoir photographer.
Firas Jannan is laying bare the secrets of his career as a boudoir photographer.
New York Post

Voiceover actor Samantha Victoria is one of Jannan’s clients, and told The Post she decided to strip down to gain a sense of self-confidence.

“I was really struggling to be happy in front of the mirror. It helped me accept the body I’m lucky enough to have been born with,” she emotionally stated.

And, she said, Jannan made her feel at ease from the moment she undressed.

“The nudity is a second thought. You don’t really think about it by the time you get in front of the camera because of how comfortable you are.”

Jannan has a spare bed for his clients to pose up on during their shoots.
Jannan has a spare bed for his clients to pose on during their shoots.
New York Post

While many boudoir photographers are female, Victoria said she had no qualms about Jannan.

“Creep doesn’t have a gender,” she stated.

Indeed, the experience seems to be so personal that the subject almost forgets Jannan is in the room.

One of Victoria's images is seen in a photo book compiled after her shoot.
One of Victoria’s images is seen in a photo book compiled after her shoot.
New York Post

Past clients say the photoshoots have forced them to rethink their sense of identity, transforming the way they see themselves.

“I became a totally different person,” client Andrea DindyalI told The Post. “I take risks I normally wouldn’t take, because I broke out of that fear that was holding me back.”



[ad_2]

Source link